1.5 In the analysis and test of electronic circuits, it is often useful to connect one resistor in parallel with another to obtain a nonstandard value, one which is smaller than the smaller of the two resistors. Often, particularly during circuit testing, one resistor is already installed, in which case the second, when connected in parallel, is said to “shunt” the first. If the original resistor is 10 k, what is the value of the shunting resistor needed toreduce the combined value by 1%, 5%, 10%, and 50%? What is the result of shunting a 10-k resistor by 1 M? By 100 k? By 10 k?

5 11 - 1.5 In the analysis and test of electronic circuits, it is often useful to connect one resistor in parallel with another to obtain a nonstandard value, one which is smaller than the smaller of the two resistors. Often, particularly during circuit testing, one resistor is already installed, in which case the second, when connected in parallel, is said to “shunt” the first. If the original resistor is 10 k, what is the value of the shunting resistor needed toreduce the combined value by 1%, 5%, 10%, and 50%? What is the result of shunting a 10-k resistor by 1 M? By 100 k? By 10 k?

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images - 1.5 In the analysis and test of electronic circuits, it is often useful to connect one resistor in parallel with another to obtain a nonstandard value, one which is smaller than the smaller of the two resistors. Often, particularly during circuit testing, one resistor is already installed, in which case the second, when connected in parallel, is said to “shunt” the first. If the original resistor is 10 k, what is the value of the shunting resistor needed toreduce the combined value by 1%, 5%, 10%, and 50%? What is the result of shunting a 10-k resistor by 1 M? By 100 k? By 10 k?

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