9.16 For a short dipole with length l such that l + λ, insteadof treating the current ˜I (z) as constant along the dipole, as wasdone in Section 9-1, a more realistic approximation that ensuresthe current goes to zero at the dipole ends is to describe ˜I (z) bythe triangular function˜I (z) =5 I0(1 − 2z/l) for 0 ≤ z ≤ l/2I0(1 + 2z/l) for − l/2 ≤ z ≤ 0as shown in Fig. P9.16. Use this current distribution todetermine the following:∗(a) The far-field !E(R, θ, φ).(b) The power density S(R, θ, φ).(c) The directivity D.(d) The radiation resistance Rrad

image 319 - 9.16 For a short dipole with length l such that l + λ, insteadof treating the current ˜I (z) as constant along the dipole, as wasdone in Section 9-1, a more realistic approximation that ensuresthe current goes to zero at the dipole ends is to describe ˜I (z) bythe triangular function˜I (z) =5 I0(1 − 2z/l) for 0 ≤ z ≤ l/2I0(1 + 2z/l) for − l/2 ≤ z ≤ 0as shown in Fig. P9.16. Use this current distribution todetermine the following:∗(a) The far-field !E(R, θ, φ).(b) The power density S(R, θ, φ).(c) The directivity D.(d) The radiation resistance Rrad
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sign up for premium and access unlimited solutions for a month at just 5$(not renewed automatically) images - 9.16 For a short dipole with length l such that l + λ, insteadof treating the current ˜I (z) as constant along the dipole, as wasdone in Section 9-1, a more realistic approximation that ensuresthe current goes to zero at the dipole ends is to describe ˜I (z) bythe triangular function˜I (z) =5 I0(1 − 2z/l) for 0 ≤ z ≤ l/2I0(1 + 2z/l) for − l/2 ≤ z ≤ 0as shown in Fig. P9.16. Use this current distribution todetermine the following:∗(a) The far-field !E(R, θ, φ).(b) The power density S(R, θ, φ).(c) The directivity D.(d) The radiation resistance Rrad already a member please login